Archive for the Gold Category

Orquesta Aragon – The Heart of Havana – Cariño Records

Posted in Gold on September 4, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

This one is for the kids…

When a friend of mine asked me for some recommendations for retro Latin music I knew I had just the record for her. My friend Aurora is a school teacher, this week her class is focusing on Latin music. Aurora, previously a critic of Garbage and Gold, knew just the right place to find some quality Latin American tunes. This one is for her and her students. It is my hope that these quality sounds plant seeds in their heads that shall one day grow into some classy musical flowers.

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The record I knew I had to provide to these children is The Heart of Havana by Orquesta Aragon. A classic record of Cuban songs originally released in 1957 on RCA Victor. My copy is a reissue put out by Carino Records. These recordings are absolutely beautiful. The Afro-Cuban jazz beats move along at a danceable tempo and are never monotonous or uninteresting. The vocals, oh the vocals… they have that angelic quality that often characterizes old recordings. Vocal harmonies blend into one ethereal singing voice. Then comes the flute, oh that blessed flute and it’s fluttering like harmonies. All the pieces of the Orquesta Aragon come together to leave us with some highly memorable tunes.

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I could imagine children hearing these songs and just enjoying them for the funny lyrical sounds. The opening song “Tilín”, for example, feautures the Orquestra singing “Tilín Tilín” repeatedly followed by the flute matching the melody of the vocals. It’s fun in an innocent way and is almost reminiscent of a Walt Disney film score. There’s plenty of other songs that feature “Cha Cha Cha’s” or “Pa-Ran-Pa-Ran” that are understood by people of all ages and tongues. I know that the kids will love this music. The teacher might even want to inform them that this music was created perhaps even before Mommy and Daddy were born. That oughta get the little buggers thinking!

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There is an added level of enjoyment from a more mature and perhaps bi-lingual listener. The songs are clever, comedic and range from songs about beautiful women, island life and taking it easy, to songs about rice and steak and even a song about radioactivity. So there you have it!  A record of 1950s Cuban songs that can be enjoyed by children and adults all the same. So no matter who you are or where you are in your life throw this record on and travel back to a pre-Castro Cuba filled with fine tobacco, rum and tropicalia.

Download Here

Delroy Wilson – The Best Of – Coxsone Original Twelve

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , on July 31, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

Feel the spirit down in your soul…

What does reggae music mean to you? Does it represent the heart and soul of the Jamaican people? Can you feel the catharsis deep in the song? 500 years of slavery and suffering could not keep down love and culture.  Or does reggae music mean Bob Marley, sand, sun and sea? Cold Corona’s on a boat somewhere? Does it bring images to mind? Hammocks on the beach? Marcus Garvey’s determined mug silkscreened in red and black? Red-eyed white kids practicing nihilism in their pot-smoke fumigated dorm rooms? 

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Reggae music has been pervaded by it’s misinterpretation and abuse in recent decades. Still all it takes is for one of the classic Burning Spear songs to come through your speakers and everything else melts away. All that negativity is gone. You feel the emotion in the Spear’s voice. It cuts into you. The rhythm swallows you up and heals you. That’s reggae.

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Before there was reggae, there was rocksteady. Compared to reggae, rocksteady is more upbeat, deals with more traditional pop-song topics (love, happiness, etc.)  than the spiritual/religious/political issues dealt with in reggae music. I’m no professional, but I think most of the songs on this record lean more towards rocksteady than they do reggae.


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Delroy Wilson started off recording ska tracks for Coxsone Dodd and quickly became a mainstay of the rocksteady vocalists. This record is an original Coxsone label compilation of Delroy’s best rocksteady songs. There are many classics on here. It’s a very enjoyable listen. The songs are all very cheery and smooth. The tight rhythms and horn melodies provide subtle backup and relief from Wilson’s confident vocals. His delivery is tasteful, it balances on the line between understated and gaudy. The result is a collection of songs that I could listen to on repeat all day. It’s real music and it’s really good.

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Smokey Robinson – Dr. Steve’s Selections, Vol. 1 – Mixtape

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

“You see you’re just like me, I hope you’re satisfied.”

My dad (Steve) loves music as much as anyone I know. His tastes aren’t that diverse, but he knows what he likes and that works for him. His favorite songwriters are Smokey Robinson and Bob Dylan. He loves to say that Bob Dylan once called Smokey “America’s greatest living poet”. It’s true, a quote like that is pretty heavy, coming from someone widely regarded as one of the greatest wordsmiths in American history, love it or hate it. At first glance, it might seem strange that his two favorite musicians were operating in very different genres. My dad likes to point out how many of their songs share similar lyrics, themes, titles…etc. I think that point only really applies to Dylan’s love songs, because every love song ends up sharing a bit with every other love song. But what I think isn’t  important. My dad created this connection between two artists of his admiration and if it’s true to him, it’s true. That’s his interpretation and maybe he’s right… after all, Dylan was a fan of ol’ Smoke.

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My memories of childhood, and all the years since, are colored heavily with the sounds of Motown. We had this big jukebox filled with my dad’s 45s that used to run almost all the time. Later on it was turned on only during parties and pool games and things like that, but the library never changed. The thing is a fixture of my childhood. I used to watch the bubbles float up in front of the color changing pinwheel decorative things. My first psychedelic experiences were probably at a very young age sitting at the foot of the jukebox. I’d sit there taking in these songs usually misunderstanding the lyrics in the way that a 4-year old might. A classic lyrical mix-up for me was with the song “The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest” off of Bob Dylan’s John Wesley Harding album. I always thought the song was about a conflicted “Jewish Priest”. Smokey’s songs were less cryptic and probably more soothing to a young boy.

I’ve got to thank my dad for having such passion for music and for sharing it with me. I never experienced any sort of repulsion towards my parent’s music. Their music was always “super rad”. My dad has always been pleasantly surprised to be reassured that I think that his music is cool. It is. Smokey Robinson is an unbelievable songwriter and an equally talented vocalist/musician. I think his work is timeless and I can’t imagine anyone finding most of his work tacky or unenjoyable. If you have felt emotion, you will like Smokey. It’s emotional music through and through, but not in the hitting you over the head way. It’s pleasant. It’s sweet. It’s hypnotic. Only one person can make music like this. Smokey Robinson.

A couple months ago my dad gave me a couple old cassette tapes and asked me if I could digitize them for him. I’ve been lazy about getting around to it, but I’ve finally done it and god damn am I impressed. This cassette is a curated greatest hits album of my dad’s favorite Smokey cuts. Sure, you could download most of these songs in a high quality CD form (well not all; there’s some alternate versions on here). But you’d be missing the point. There’s charm to these transfers. Almost everyone starts with a cassette tape sound of tape speeding up, each song has a little warble to it. This is a 15-20 year old cassette that was listened to heavily.  There are some surprises hidden in the mix. Track 6 is my personal favorite, it starts with the opening line of “Whose Gonna Take the Blame” and then cuts into some other jingle for a bar and then cuts again into “Different Strokes for Different Folks”. To some it is just the result of bad tape cueing; sloppy mix-tape making. To others, and I hope that’s all of us here, it’s a beautiful accident, the sort that not even the best DJ could emulate. This mix-tape is just begging to be sampled.

So on this Father’s Day, I’m not only going to share his digitized tape with him, but with all of you too. I hope you all enjoy it this summer. It’s perfect for playing during a nice evening with your closest friend(s) by candlelight.

Steve and Nona

I want to thank my dad for instilling such good taste in music in me from a young age. I know that he secretly wishes he had become a musician. He gave up guitar lessons as a boy. Well Dad… don’t worry, I’ve got that locked down for the both of us. Just sit back and enjoy this music. I’ll take care of the rest.

Download Here

Tracklist

1. I Want to Be Your Love

2.We’ve Saved the Best for Last

3. If You Can Want

4. Here I Go Again

5. Baby, Baby Don’t Cry

6. Who’s Gonna Take the Blame/Satisfaction (medley)

7. We’ve Come too Far to End it Now/I’ll Try Something New

8. I’ll Try Something New (Alternate Version)

9. You Cannot Laugh Alone (Deep in My Soul)

10. Jasmin

11. Easy 

12. Just to See Her

13. Keep Me

14. One Heartbeat

Carnaval 87 – Sambas De Enredo – RCA

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

Travel to Rio for Sex, Sand, Sun and Sambas!

Sambas De Enredo (Pronounced EN-HEH-DO) is a series of live recordings from Carnival 1987. There are plenty of resources out there to learn about Samba Enredo (start here and here). Basically it is a particular type of Samba that is performed during annually Carnival in Rio de Jainero, Brazil. These Sambas are performed by large masses of performes grouped into “schools”. The schools sing play their songs as a sort of performance as part of the Carnival festivities. Samba-enredo is one of the main forms of Samba associated with Carnival.

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The recordings presented here are massive. Choruses of vocalists create a harmonized group-voice that creates beautiful vocal melodies over the pounding multi-rhythmic percussion that is the backbone of Samba. The rhythm has so many different layers to it that it can sound like caucaphony to the unaccustomed ear. I assure you that this is anything but sloppy. This is a very meticulous and calculated song form. These schools apparently Here’s a good video showing the many layers that construct a typical Samba-enredo beat:

I procrastinated releasing this album on G&G for months while I waited for the right person to translate the lyrics for me. After several months my drive to post to the blog completely disappeared. I am ashamed to admit it but in the end it was simply out of laziness and lack of drive. I am back now and plan on posting at least one post a day for the next week or two. In embracing this new sense of drive, I’ve decided that knowing the lyrics aren’t important. I’ve written a short poem about the album instead. I hope that you enjoy the songs.

The masses exclaim in melody

Like the song of the waves crashing

On different shorelines

In different countries, for different ears

Who understand vastly different tongues

Yet the song is the same 

And understood by all.

This record comes from Phil Elverum’s personal collection. I bought it from an online sale he had of some of his records. Also, if anyone wants to try and translate these songs or song titles for the rest of us that would be great. Just message me.

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Download Here

Jimmie Skinner – #1 Bluegrass – Gusto Records

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , on June 10, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

“Everybody’s askin’ what’s happened to Country…”

Jimmie Skinner confesses on his 1977 album, “#1 Bluegrass”. There’s weight behind those words. Skinner has experienced the lament of concerned Country music fans first hand as a touring Bluegrass musician. In the late 70s Country music  was experiencing a number of revivals. The “Outlaw” Country musicians were having their moment in the spotlight… guys like Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Johnny Paycheck, of course Johnny Cash had also embraced that ethos. Country was being influenced by rock music, the line between the two was becoming more blurred with each year that passed. On the other hand you had the more pop country tunes coming out from the likes of Kenny Rogers, Glen Campbell and John Denver. Depending on your perspective you might call it progression, degression or evolution of a form. Country music was fighting to stay relevant. It was adapting to the changing times. Traditionalists were pushed to the fringes of the genre. Small neotraditionalists and revival movements popped up in different regions of the country. The acoustic/string band movement is experiencing a similar revival today. Just take a trip to any big city in the country and you’ll find that to be true. Everyone listener and critic had their opinion on the state of country music. But what did the old-timers think? What was it like being a long-time recording artist trying to stay afloat in a sinking form of musical expression? Jimmy Skinner put his thoughts on record for us to hear.

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“It’s blowing away.”

Jimmie Skinner was born in 1909 and died in 1979, two years after the release of this, his final album. With 50+ years of songwriting under his belt, Skinner felt no need to change his tried and true formula. These are straight-up, roots Bluegrass songs; the record is a sort of living anachronism. Despite what the opening paragraph might lead you to believe, there’s nothing doleful about these songs. Almost every song is uplifting and positive. There are songs about being an independent recording artist, as Skinner often was.  On the album’s third song, “This Old Road”, Skinner goes into a bit of spoken word about his place in the music industry. He talks about pressing his own records, booking his own tours and generally adhering to a DIY ethic. He expresses his struggles in keeping up with the likes of country music legends like George Jones. This song is a sort of proto-punk/indie anthem. In fact, a very interesting aspect to Skinner’s career is that he self-released a lot of his records. The guy was way ahead of his time. The record was way past it’s time. While other artists were conforming to whatever trend was hot at the time, Skinner stuck to his guns and delivers some real fine American “roots” music.

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“Big brown eyes and curly hair, lips sweet as sugar cane, ‘fore that evening sun goes down, I’m gonna change her name. That old moon’s a’ shinin’ down in lover’s lane.”

Some of the other highlights of the album are, “Whoopie Liza” a new version of Skinner’s classic single, “My Little Liza Jane”, “Don’t Do it and it Won’t Be on Your Mind”, a little morality number about the pitfalls of cheating and how to avoid it. In that song there’s a little tip of the hat to the classic Ernest Tubb number, “Warm Red Wine”. “Fallen Leaves” is a cheery up-tempo number for fans of faster Bluegrass music.

They say you should respect your elders, there’s a lot you can learn from someone who has been around the block. Jimmie Skinner is more deserving of that respect than any recording artist I know of. These songs have a special sting to them when sung through his matured throat. It’s a great album to enjoy sit back and enjoy the summer breeze with. I hope that you enjoy it as much as I have. God Bless America and Long Live Country Music.

Download Here

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Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young – On The Right Track – Wally Jug Records

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 7, 2012 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

4 Voices in Harmony 4 Ever…

One of the first records I ever owned was given to me by my father: the self-titled album by Crosby, Stills and Nash. He gave it to me with an anecdote about how he and his buddies used to get really stoned listening to it and that it had a bunch of great songs on it. In particular he mentioned “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” and “Marakesh Express”. He explained that Marakesh Express is a song about smuggling hash, I’m still not sure whether it’s true or not, but that doesn’t matter. Later on, when I first brought those dusty grooves to life again, there was a magic feeling that came along with it. Now those of you who are familiar with the record know that part of that magic was strictly a product of the genius of these 3 young musicians. But, on top of that, there was this amazing feeling of touching the same record my Dad did at around the same age as he would’ve been, listening to the same songs, and of course getting high to them as well. Inherited records will do that to you.

This record is not that record. I came across this record about 5 years later on in the story of my life. Much like the other bootlegs I have found while crate-digging, something stood out to me with this record. It seemed shoddy, poorly put together and well… bootleg. On the front cover there’s this picture of the musicians in sepia-tone, posing with guns in front of a rail-house likes it’s the old west. Underneath the photo the words, “Stillscros B. Jungnash” and on top the title, “On The Right Track” and that’s all the text there is on the cover. The back has the track-listings (which you will soon discover to be an unbeatable greatest-hits set-list), the date of the recording reads “Lakehurst, NJ 6/7/70”,  the musicians’ names and a short epitaph reading, “4 Voices in Harmony 4 Ever”, all of this superimposed over old Steam-Train design diagrams. Right in the middle there appears to be a drawing of two men drilling into an older man’s head. Interesting.

The music on these discs is an unofficial live recording purportedly made during the Lakehurst, New Jersey show on June 7th, 1970. I have discovered some internet commentary stating that there is no way that this is from the Lakehurst show. Some fans like to think it’s from the Fillmore East shows during the bands week-long residency earlier in 1970.  I’m not sure who to believe, but, I’ll settle on it being from 1970 and leave it at that.  Like most bootlegs, the sound quality is pretty crappy, but that’s not what this record is all about. This record is about the performance and how the band experimented with their songs and what comes in between the songs. It’s about getting to know these musicians in a way that would be impossible otherwise, through their colloquy between songs. Hearing these guys bullshit and banter in their post-Summer of Love hippie accents provides for some of the best moments on this record. But let’s not forget the music.

In the same way the band started their debut, this bootleg starts with “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes”. They then switch things up with an ultra-slow version of the Beatles, “Blackbird” which even the band members seem to be taken a-back by. One of them even suggests that they try it again. Then Neil Young arrives and things get a whole lot better. Young’s seamless medley of his own songs on Side 2 (Tell Me Why/The Loner/Cinnamon Girl/Down by the River”) is a high-point in this performance. The record continues steadily  up  until Stephen Stills decides to tune his guitar to play the blues and performs his song, “Black Queen”, sharing his inspiration for the song while getting ready. Then Side 4 comes along and things really take off. Neil Young’s songwriting really steals the show as the group finishes up with “Helplessly Hoping”, “Ohio” and “Southern Man”. It’s really something that needs to be heard by all of you. So, don’t let me waste anymore of your time. Download the recording below and enjoy. Remember, as far as I know, this is the only place on the internet where you can hear this album. Feel special. Stay tuned for more fun.

-XXX

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Elvis Presley – Got A Lot O’ Livin’ To Do – Pirate Records/Ghost Production – Bootleg

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2012 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

As if he needed any introduction…

In the time of 10-minute pop-stars, trash idols and with so many worshipping the junk they produce, it is apt now more than ever, to revisit the work of Elvis Presley. I could go on and wax poetic about the nature of celebrity, the history of rock and roll and the life and music of Elvis Presley. I could even rant about how I  am  immediately cast into a world of endless sadness when I hear the pop-music of today. But we like to keep it focused on the content here at Garbage & Gold, so, I’ll just say this: so much can be learned from Elvis.  I don’t mean that we could learn from Elvis: the man. I’m talking about Elvis: the music. Like any pop-song, we’ve all heard Elvis’ biggest hits countless times. We’ve heard them to the point where they don’t mean anything anymore. They almost don’t sound like anything anymore either. Sometimes it takes a slap in the face to wake up from this nightmare. I hope that this record might be that slap for some of you loyal listeners. I urge all of you to take a step back, listen to this record and try to rediscover the magic of The King.


This record is a rare bootleg containing 2 film soundtracks (Jailhouse Rock and Loving You) where Elvis star (and sings) as musicians Vince Everett and Deke Rivers. The record contains the takes that ended up being used in the movie. The official soundtrack released by RCA contains different cuts of these songs that were not used in the film.  It is a very special collectors piece for those Elvis fans out there. Included on this record is a set of phone interviews between Dick Clark and Elvis while Elvis was serving in the Army in Germany.  Also included is a collage of excerpts from Elvis’ live performance in Vancouver, Canada – September 1, 1957. The quality is extremely lo-fi and it isn’t a very good listen.

Liner Notes from the Record:

           Elvis Presley recorded the songs for the LOVING YOU movie in Hollywood between February and March, 1957. Most of the cuts on this LP are different versions than the ones released on record, especially the fast version of “Loving You” and the version of “Party” which has a different verse added. In May, 1957, Elvis went to the MGM Studios, Culver City, California to cut the JAILHOUSE ROCK soundtrack. Again, most of the takes he sings in the movie are different than what was released. It’s quite evident that either film companies or RCA own tapes of all of these, but it is very doubtful if they will ever be issued. This is a pity because, while they are bascially the same as the tracks put on record, ardent Elvis fans would love to hear the mistakes and different pgrasing Elvis does on them. Hence, the reason for this LP.

Besides the two soundtracks, this LP also contains excerpts from Elvis’ September 1, 1957 “live” concert in Vancouver, Canada. Unfortunately, it is only close to 5 minutes in length and really gives a very brief glimpse into early Elvis’ performance, but it is worth hearing simply because, up until now, there has been NO record released –either bootleg or otherwise– of a “live” concert from the 50’s. However, it is quite possible that this entire show will be made available to Elvis fans in the months to come. In the meantime, enjoy listening to the King at his best.

As an extra added bonus, two interviews with Dick Clark have been included. Both were done via telephone while Elvis was in the Army in Germany and the quality isn’t the best but we think they are of enough interest to warrant inclusion.

– THE PIRATE

Rock yourselves silly with this one…

Yours Truly,

X

Tracklisting:

Side A:

1) Jailhouse Rock Soundtrack – 23:00

2) Dick Clark Interviews – 7:00

Side B:

1) Loving You Soundtrack – 23:00

2) Vancouver, Canada – Sept. 1, 1957 – “Live” – EXCERPTS ONLY – 5:00

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