Archive for AMERICAN

Happy Independence Day – Carmen Dragon – Stephen Foster Melodies – Capitol

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on July 7, 2013 by xxx

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I’m doing this one from the road, so I apologize for the lack of quality images or thoughtful writing. Here’s some good old-time music for the holiday. Carmen Dragon and his Orchestra perform Stephen Foster’s most famous compositions. These are beautiful versions of these songs, I much prefer them to the choral versions that you typically find. Perfect for driving through some southern landscapes or sitting in the comfort of your own home and reflecting on this great nation.

Tracklist:

1. De Camptown Races

2. My Old Kentucky Home

3. Old Black Joe

4. Old Dog Tray

5. Massa’s In the Cold, Cold Ground

6. Oh! Susanna

7. Jeannie With the Light Brown Hair

8. Old Folds at Home

9. Come Where My Love Lies Dreaming

Download Here

Smokey Robinson – Dr. Steve’s Selections, Vol. 1 – Mixtape

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

“You see you’re just like me, I hope you’re satisfied.”

My dad (Steve) loves music as much as anyone I know. His tastes aren’t that diverse, but he knows what he likes and that works for him. His favorite songwriters are Smokey Robinson and Bob Dylan. He loves to say that Bob Dylan once called Smokey “America’s greatest living poet”. It’s true, a quote like that is pretty heavy, coming from someone widely regarded as one of the greatest wordsmiths in American history, love it or hate it. At first glance, it might seem strange that his two favorite musicians were operating in very different genres. My dad likes to point out how many of their songs share similar lyrics, themes, titles…etc. I think that point only really applies to Dylan’s love songs, because every love song ends up sharing a bit with every other love song. But what I think isn’t  important. My dad created this connection between two artists of his admiration and if it’s true to him, it’s true. That’s his interpretation and maybe he’s right… after all, Dylan was a fan of ol’ Smoke.

Smoke

My memories of childhood, and all the years since, are colored heavily with the sounds of Motown. We had this big jukebox filled with my dad’s 45s that used to run almost all the time. Later on it was turned on only during parties and pool games and things like that, but the library never changed. The thing is a fixture of my childhood. I used to watch the bubbles float up in front of the color changing pinwheel decorative things. My first psychedelic experiences were probably at a very young age sitting at the foot of the jukebox. I’d sit there taking in these songs usually misunderstanding the lyrics in the way that a 4-year old might. A classic lyrical mix-up for me was with the song “The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest” off of Bob Dylan’s John Wesley Harding album. I always thought the song was about a conflicted “Jewish Priest”. Smokey’s songs were less cryptic and probably more soothing to a young boy.

I’ve got to thank my dad for having such passion for music and for sharing it with me. I never experienced any sort of repulsion towards my parent’s music. Their music was always “super rad”. My dad has always been pleasantly surprised to be reassured that I think that his music is cool. It is. Smokey Robinson is an unbelievable songwriter and an equally talented vocalist/musician. I think his work is timeless and I can’t imagine anyone finding most of his work tacky or unenjoyable. If you have felt emotion, you will like Smokey. It’s emotional music through and through, but not in the hitting you over the head way. It’s pleasant. It’s sweet. It’s hypnotic. Only one person can make music like this. Smokey Robinson.

A couple months ago my dad gave me a couple old cassette tapes and asked me if I could digitize them for him. I’ve been lazy about getting around to it, but I’ve finally done it and god damn am I impressed. This cassette is a curated greatest hits album of my dad’s favorite Smokey cuts. Sure, you could download most of these songs in a high quality CD form (well not all; there’s some alternate versions on here). But you’d be missing the point. There’s charm to these transfers. Almost everyone starts with a cassette tape sound of tape speeding up, each song has a little warble to it. This is a 15-20 year old cassette that was listened to heavily.  There are some surprises hidden in the mix. Track 6 is my personal favorite, it starts with the opening line of “Whose Gonna Take the Blame” and then cuts into some other jingle for a bar and then cuts again into “Different Strokes for Different Folks”. To some it is just the result of bad tape cueing; sloppy mix-tape making. To others, and I hope that’s all of us here, it’s a beautiful accident, the sort that not even the best DJ could emulate. This mix-tape is just begging to be sampled.

So on this Father’s Day, I’m not only going to share his digitized tape with him, but with all of you too. I hope you all enjoy it this summer. It’s perfect for playing during a nice evening with your closest friend(s) by candlelight.

Steve and Nona

I want to thank my dad for instilling such good taste in music in me from a young age. I know that he secretly wishes he had become a musician. He gave up guitar lessons as a boy. Well Dad… don’t worry, I’ve got that locked down for the both of us. Just sit back and enjoy this music. I’ll take care of the rest.

Download Here

Tracklist

1. I Want to Be Your Love

2.We’ve Saved the Best for Last

3. If You Can Want

4. Here I Go Again

5. Baby, Baby Don’t Cry

6. Who’s Gonna Take the Blame/Satisfaction (medley)

7. We’ve Come too Far to End it Now/I’ll Try Something New

8. I’ll Try Something New (Alternate Version)

9. You Cannot Laugh Alone (Deep in My Soul)

10. Jasmin

11. Easy 

12. Just to See Her

13. Keep Me

14. One Heartbeat

Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young – On The Right Track – Wally Jug Records

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 7, 2012 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

4 Voices in Harmony 4 Ever…

One of the first records I ever owned was given to me by my father: the self-titled album by Crosby, Stills and Nash. He gave it to me with an anecdote about how he and his buddies used to get really stoned listening to it and that it had a bunch of great songs on it. In particular he mentioned “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” and “Marakesh Express”. He explained that Marakesh Express is a song about smuggling hash, I’m still not sure whether it’s true or not, but that doesn’t matter. Later on, when I first brought those dusty grooves to life again, there was a magic feeling that came along with it. Now those of you who are familiar with the record know that part of that magic was strictly a product of the genius of these 3 young musicians. But, on top of that, there was this amazing feeling of touching the same record my Dad did at around the same age as he would’ve been, listening to the same songs, and of course getting high to them as well. Inherited records will do that to you.

This record is not that record. I came across this record about 5 years later on in the story of my life. Much like the other bootlegs I have found while crate-digging, something stood out to me with this record. It seemed shoddy, poorly put together and well… bootleg. On the front cover there’s this picture of the musicians in sepia-tone, posing with guns in front of a rail-house likes it’s the old west. Underneath the photo the words, “Stillscros B. Jungnash” and on top the title, “On The Right Track” and that’s all the text there is on the cover. The back has the track-listings (which you will soon discover to be an unbeatable greatest-hits set-list), the date of the recording reads “Lakehurst, NJ 6/7/70”,  the musicians’ names and a short epitaph reading, “4 Voices in Harmony 4 Ever”, all of this superimposed over old Steam-Train design diagrams. Right in the middle there appears to be a drawing of two men drilling into an older man’s head. Interesting.

The music on these discs is an unofficial live recording purportedly made during the Lakehurst, New Jersey show on June 7th, 1970. I have discovered some internet commentary stating that there is no way that this is from the Lakehurst show. Some fans like to think it’s from the Fillmore East shows during the bands week-long residency earlier in 1970.  I’m not sure who to believe, but, I’ll settle on it being from 1970 and leave it at that.  Like most bootlegs, the sound quality is pretty crappy, but that’s not what this record is all about. This record is about the performance and how the band experimented with their songs and what comes in between the songs. It’s about getting to know these musicians in a way that would be impossible otherwise, through their colloquy between songs. Hearing these guys bullshit and banter in their post-Summer of Love hippie accents provides for some of the best moments on this record. But let’s not forget the music.

In the same way the band started their debut, this bootleg starts with “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes”. They then switch things up with an ultra-slow version of the Beatles, “Blackbird” which even the band members seem to be taken a-back by. One of them even suggests that they try it again. Then Neil Young arrives and things get a whole lot better. Young’s seamless medley of his own songs on Side 2 (Tell Me Why/The Loner/Cinnamon Girl/Down by the River”) is a high-point in this performance. The record continues steadily  up  until Stephen Stills decides to tune his guitar to play the blues and performs his song, “Black Queen”, sharing his inspiration for the song while getting ready. Then Side 4 comes along and things really take off. Neil Young’s songwriting really steals the show as the group finishes up with “Helplessly Hoping”, “Ohio” and “Southern Man”. It’s really something that needs to be heard by all of you. So, don’t let me waste anymore of your time. Download the recording below and enjoy. Remember, as far as I know, this is the only place on the internet where you can hear this album. Feel special. Stay tuned for more fun.

-XXX

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Elvis Presley – Got A Lot O’ Livin’ To Do – Pirate Records/Ghost Production – Bootleg

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 15, 2012 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

As if he needed any introduction…

In the time of 10-minute pop-stars, trash idols and with so many worshipping the junk they produce, it is apt now more than ever, to revisit the work of Elvis Presley. I could go on and wax poetic about the nature of celebrity, the history of rock and roll and the life and music of Elvis Presley. I could even rant about how I  am  immediately cast into a world of endless sadness when I hear the pop-music of today. But we like to keep it focused on the content here at Garbage & Gold, so, I’ll just say this: so much can be learned from Elvis.  I don’t mean that we could learn from Elvis: the man. I’m talking about Elvis: the music. Like any pop-song, we’ve all heard Elvis’ biggest hits countless times. We’ve heard them to the point where they don’t mean anything anymore. They almost don’t sound like anything anymore either. Sometimes it takes a slap in the face to wake up from this nightmare. I hope that this record might be that slap for some of you loyal listeners. I urge all of you to take a step back, listen to this record and try to rediscover the magic of The King.


This record is a rare bootleg containing 2 film soundtracks (Jailhouse Rock and Loving You) where Elvis star (and sings) as musicians Vince Everett and Deke Rivers. The record contains the takes that ended up being used in the movie. The official soundtrack released by RCA contains different cuts of these songs that were not used in the film.  It is a very special collectors piece for those Elvis fans out there. Included on this record is a set of phone interviews between Dick Clark and Elvis while Elvis was serving in the Army in Germany.  Also included is a collage of excerpts from Elvis’ live performance in Vancouver, Canada – September 1, 1957. The quality is extremely lo-fi and it isn’t a very good listen.

Liner Notes from the Record:

           Elvis Presley recorded the songs for the LOVING YOU movie in Hollywood between February and March, 1957. Most of the cuts on this LP are different versions than the ones released on record, especially the fast version of “Loving You” and the version of “Party” which has a different verse added. In May, 1957, Elvis went to the MGM Studios, Culver City, California to cut the JAILHOUSE ROCK soundtrack. Again, most of the takes he sings in the movie are different than what was released. It’s quite evident that either film companies or RCA own tapes of all of these, but it is very doubtful if they will ever be issued. This is a pity because, while they are bascially the same as the tracks put on record, ardent Elvis fans would love to hear the mistakes and different pgrasing Elvis does on them. Hence, the reason for this LP.

Besides the two soundtracks, this LP also contains excerpts from Elvis’ September 1, 1957 “live” concert in Vancouver, Canada. Unfortunately, it is only close to 5 minutes in length and really gives a very brief glimpse into early Elvis’ performance, but it is worth hearing simply because, up until now, there has been NO record released –either bootleg or otherwise– of a “live” concert from the 50’s. However, it is quite possible that this entire show will be made available to Elvis fans in the months to come. In the meantime, enjoy listening to the King at his best.

As an extra added bonus, two interviews with Dick Clark have been included. Both were done via telephone while Elvis was in the Army in Germany and the quality isn’t the best but we think they are of enough interest to warrant inclusion.

– THE PIRATE

Rock yourselves silly with this one…

Yours Truly,

X

Tracklisting:

Side A:

1) Jailhouse Rock Soundtrack – 23:00

2) Dick Clark Interviews – 7:00

Side B:

1) Loving You Soundtrack – 23:00

2) Vancouver, Canada – Sept. 1, 1957 – “Live” – EXCERPTS ONLY – 5:00

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#10: The Johnny Otis Show – Cold Shot – United

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , on January 22, 2012 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

I was listening to John Mayall play the blues when I heard the news,

Headlines read that Johnny Otis, the legendary band-leader and Los Angeles cultural icon, had passed. The newspapers called him “the Godfather of Rhythm and Blues” and told of his legacy of influence that he had on music. Reading about him, I learned all about this man and his strange life as a Greek-American who became an important figure in African-American music. By and large, young people today don’t know his name, but Johnny Otis’ legacy can’t be avoided. For one, he discovered many musicians and produced songs that we all know and love. More importantly (for me), he was the father of Shuggie Otis, the songwriter of Strawberry Letter 23 and teenage-virtuoso guitarist… just an incredible musician in his own right.  That’s how I came to learn about Johnny Otis: through the music of his son.

The album that I’m sharing here is called Cold Shot by The Johnny Otis Show feat. Mighty Mouth Evans and Shuggie Otis on guitar. It was originally released in 1969, but this copy is the United reissue from the 1970s. It’s a great blues album with some really fun songs featuring great production and, as mentioned before, the maestro guitar work of a 16-year old Shuggie Otis. Country Girl, Cold Shot, Sittin’ Here All Alone and Goin’ Back To LA are standout tracks for me. Just a really great album filled with tremendous amounts of heart and soul. I hope that you enjoy it.

In Honor of Johnny Otis : 1921 – 2012 :

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