Archive for Samba

Delroy Wilson – The Best Of – Coxsone Original Twelve

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , on July 31, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

Feel the spirit down in your soul…

What does reggae music mean to you? Does it represent the heart and soul of the Jamaican people? Can you feel the catharsis deep in the song? 500 years of slavery and suffering could not keep down love and culture.  Or does reggae music mean Bob Marley, sand, sun and sea? Cold Corona’s on a boat somewhere? Does it bring images to mind? Hammocks on the beach? Marcus Garvey’s determined mug silkscreened in red and black? Red-eyed white kids practicing nihilism in their pot-smoke fumigated dorm rooms? 

tumblr_loya0iNmCS1qd1qgs

Reggae music has been pervaded by it’s misinterpretation and abuse in recent decades. Still all it takes is for one of the classic Burning Spear songs to come through your speakers and everything else melts away. All that negativity is gone. You feel the emotion in the Spear’s voice. It cuts into you. The rhythm swallows you up and heals you. That’s reggae.

image_1

Before there was reggae, there was rocksteady. Compared to reggae, rocksteady is more upbeat, deals with more traditional pop-song topics (love, happiness, etc.)  than the spiritual/religious/political issues dealt with in reggae music. I’m no professional, but I think most of the songs on this record lean more towards rocksteady than they do reggae.


image

Delroy Wilson started off recording ska tracks for Coxsone Dodd and quickly became a mainstay of the rocksteady vocalists. This record is an original Coxsone label compilation of Delroy’s best rocksteady songs. There are many classics on here. It’s a very enjoyable listen. The songs are all very cheery and smooth. The tight rhythms and horn melodies provide subtle backup and relief from Wilson’s confident vocals. His delivery is tasteful, it balances on the line between understated and gaudy. The result is a collection of songs that I could listen to on repeat all day. It’s real music and it’s really good.

Download Here

 

Smokey Robinson – Dr. Steve’s Selections, Vol. 1 – Mixtape

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

“You see you’re just like me, I hope you’re satisfied.”

My dad (Steve) loves music as much as anyone I know. His tastes aren’t that diverse, but he knows what he likes and that works for him. His favorite songwriters are Smokey Robinson and Bob Dylan. He loves to say that Bob Dylan once called Smokey “America’s greatest living poet”. It’s true, a quote like that is pretty heavy, coming from someone widely regarded as one of the greatest wordsmiths in American history, love it or hate it. At first glance, it might seem strange that his two favorite musicians were operating in very different genres. My dad likes to point out how many of their songs share similar lyrics, themes, titles…etc. I think that point only really applies to Dylan’s love songs, because every love song ends up sharing a bit with every other love song. But what I think isn’t  important. My dad created this connection between two artists of his admiration and if it’s true to him, it’s true. That’s his interpretation and maybe he’s right… after all, Dylan was a fan of ol’ Smoke.

Smoke

My memories of childhood, and all the years since, are colored heavily with the sounds of Motown. We had this big jukebox filled with my dad’s 45s that used to run almost all the time. Later on it was turned on only during parties and pool games and things like that, but the library never changed. The thing is a fixture of my childhood. I used to watch the bubbles float up in front of the color changing pinwheel decorative things. My first psychedelic experiences were probably at a very young age sitting at the foot of the jukebox. I’d sit there taking in these songs usually misunderstanding the lyrics in the way that a 4-year old might. A classic lyrical mix-up for me was with the song “The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest” off of Bob Dylan’s John Wesley Harding album. I always thought the song was about a conflicted “Jewish Priest”. Smokey’s songs were less cryptic and probably more soothing to a young boy.

I’ve got to thank my dad for having such passion for music and for sharing it with me. I never experienced any sort of repulsion towards my parent’s music. Their music was always “super rad”. My dad has always been pleasantly surprised to be reassured that I think that his music is cool. It is. Smokey Robinson is an unbelievable songwriter and an equally talented vocalist/musician. I think his work is timeless and I can’t imagine anyone finding most of his work tacky or unenjoyable. If you have felt emotion, you will like Smokey. It’s emotional music through and through, but not in the hitting you over the head way. It’s pleasant. It’s sweet. It’s hypnotic. Only one person can make music like this. Smokey Robinson.

A couple months ago my dad gave me a couple old cassette tapes and asked me if I could digitize them for him. I’ve been lazy about getting around to it, but I’ve finally done it and god damn am I impressed. This cassette is a curated greatest hits album of my dad’s favorite Smokey cuts. Sure, you could download most of these songs in a high quality CD form (well not all; there’s some alternate versions on here). But you’d be missing the point. There’s charm to these transfers. Almost everyone starts with a cassette tape sound of tape speeding up, each song has a little warble to it. This is a 15-20 year old cassette that was listened to heavily.  There are some surprises hidden in the mix. Track 6 is my personal favorite, it starts with the opening line of “Whose Gonna Take the Blame” and then cuts into some other jingle for a bar and then cuts again into “Different Strokes for Different Folks”. To some it is just the result of bad tape cueing; sloppy mix-tape making. To others, and I hope that’s all of us here, it’s a beautiful accident, the sort that not even the best DJ could emulate. This mix-tape is just begging to be sampled.

So on this Father’s Day, I’m not only going to share his digitized tape with him, but with all of you too. I hope you all enjoy it this summer. It’s perfect for playing during a nice evening with your closest friend(s) by candlelight.

Steve and Nona

I want to thank my dad for instilling such good taste in music in me from a young age. I know that he secretly wishes he had become a musician. He gave up guitar lessons as a boy. Well Dad… don’t worry, I’ve got that locked down for the both of us. Just sit back and enjoy this music. I’ll take care of the rest.

Download Here

Tracklist

1. I Want to Be Your Love

2.We’ve Saved the Best for Last

3. If You Can Want

4. Here I Go Again

5. Baby, Baby Don’t Cry

6. Who’s Gonna Take the Blame/Satisfaction (medley)

7. We’ve Come too Far to End it Now/I’ll Try Something New

8. I’ll Try Something New (Alternate Version)

9. You Cannot Laugh Alone (Deep in My Soul)

10. Jasmin

11. Easy 

12. Just to See Her

13. Keep Me

14. One Heartbeat

Carnaval 87 – Sambas De Enredo – RCA

Posted in Gold with tags , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2013 by xxx
As always the download link is located at the bottom of the post.

Travel to Rio for Sex, Sand, Sun and Sambas!

Sambas De Enredo (Pronounced EN-HEH-DO) is a series of live recordings from Carnival 1987. There are plenty of resources out there to learn about Samba Enredo (start here and here). Basically it is a particular type of Samba that is performed during annually Carnival in Rio de Jainero, Brazil. These Sambas are performed by large masses of performes grouped into “schools”. The schools sing play their songs as a sort of performance as part of the Carnival festivities. Samba-enredo is one of the main forms of Samba associated with Carnival.

enredoimage

The recordings presented here are massive. Choruses of vocalists create a harmonized group-voice that creates beautiful vocal melodies over the pounding multi-rhythmic percussion that is the backbone of Samba. The rhythm has so many different layers to it that it can sound like caucaphony to the unaccustomed ear. I assure you that this is anything but sloppy. This is a very meticulous and calculated song form. These schools apparently Here’s a good video showing the many layers that construct a typical Samba-enredo beat:

I procrastinated releasing this album on G&G for months while I waited for the right person to translate the lyrics for me. After several months my drive to post to the blog completely disappeared. I am ashamed to admit it but in the end it was simply out of laziness and lack of drive. I am back now and plan on posting at least one post a day for the next week or two. In embracing this new sense of drive, I’ve decided that knowing the lyrics aren’t important. I’ve written a short poem about the album instead. I hope that you enjoy the songs.

The masses exclaim in melody

Like the song of the waves crashing

On different shorelines

In different countries, for different ears

Who understand vastly different tongues

Yet the song is the same 

And understood by all.

This record comes from Phil Elverum’s personal collection. I bought it from an online sale he had of some of his records. Also, if anyone wants to try and translate these songs or song titles for the rest of us that would be great. Just message me.

enredoback

Download Here